4th International ICST Conference on Performance Evaluation Methodologies and Tools

Research Article

Network calculus and queueing theory: two sides of one coin: invited paper

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/ICST.VALUETOOLS2009.7450,
        author={Yuming Jiang},
        title={Network calculus and queueing theory: two sides of one coin: invited paper},
        proceedings={4th International ICST Conference on Performance Evaluation Methodologies and Tools},
        publisher={ICST},
        proceedings_a={VALUETOOLS},
        year={2010},
        month={5},
        keywords={},
        doi={10.4108/ICST.VALUETOOLS2009.7450}
    }
    
  • Yuming Jiang
    Year: 2010
    Network calculus and queueing theory: two sides of one coin: invited paper
    VALUETOOLS
    ICST
    DOI: 10.4108/ICST.VALUETOOLS2009.7450
Yuming Jiang1
  • 1: Certre for Quantifiable Quality of Service in Communication Systems,  Department of Telematics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Abstract

Network calculus is a theory dealing with queueing type problems encountered in computer networks, with particu- lar focus on quality of service guarantee analysis. Queueing theory is the mathematical study of queues, proven to be applicable to a wide area of problems, generally concerning about the (average) quantities in an equilibrium state. Since both network calculus and queueing theory are analytical tools for studying queues, a question arises naturally as is if and where network calculus and queueing theory meet. In this paper, we explore queueing principles that underlie net- work calculus and exemplify their use. Particularly, based on the network calculus queueing principles, we show that for GI/GI/1, similar inequalities in the theory of queues can be derived. In addition, we prove that the end-to-end per- formance of a tandem network is independent of the order of servers in the network even under some general settings. Through these, we present a network calculus perspective on queues and relate network calculus to queueing theory.