3d International ICST Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare

Research Article

Vesta: A secure and autonomic system for pervasive healthcare

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/ICST.PERVASIVEHEALTH2009.5939,
        author={Yanmin Zhu and Morris Sloman and Emil Lupu and Sye Loong Keoh},
        title={Vesta: A secure and autonomic system for pervasive healthcare},
        proceedings={3d International ICST Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare},
        proceedings_a={PERVASIVEHEALTH},
        year={2009},
        month={8},
        keywords={Actuators Biomedical monitoring Biosensors Blood Body sensor networks Communication system control Handheld computers Heart rate Medical services Wireless communication},
        doi={10.4108/ICST.PERVASIVEHEALTH2009.5939}
    }
    
  • Yanmin Zhu
    Morris Sloman
    Emil Lupu
    Sye Loong Keoh
    Year: 2009
    Vesta: A secure and autonomic system for pervasive healthcare
    PERVASIVEHEALTH
    ICST
    DOI: 10.4108/ICST.PERVASIVEHEALTH2009.5939
Yanmin Zhu1,2,*, Morris Sloman1,*, Emil Lupu1,*, Sye Loong Keoh1,*
  • 1: lmperial College London
  • 2: Shanghai Jiao Tong University
*Contact email: yzhu@doc.ic.ac.uk, m.sloman@doc.ic.ac.uk, e.c.lupu@doc.ic.ac.uk, sye.loong.keoh@gmail.com

Abstract

The proliferation of low-power wireless communications and handheld devices has facilitated the development of pervasive systems for healthcare applications. This paper describes a body sensor network comprising a personal controller, various biosensors and actuators for pervasive healthcare. Various physiological parameters such as heart rate or blood oxygen level can be continuously monitored. The growing complexity of such systems, however, poses challenges for system management and security. In this paper we present a secure autonomic body sensor network called Vesta which makes use of the extensible architecture pattern of a self managed cell (SMC). A policy-driven management paradigm supports adaptability to contextual changes by applying event-condition-action rules. Fine-grained access control of the system is realized through authorization policies. Experimental evaluation shows that it is viable and practical for real-world pervasive healthcare.