cs 15(4): e3

Research Article

Design of novel screening environments for Mild Cognitive Impairment: giving priority to elicited speech and language abilities

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  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2015.258945,
        author={Sofia Segkouli and Ioannis Paliokas and Dimitrios Tzovaras and Dimitrios Giakoumis and Charalampos Karagiannidis},
        title={Design of novel screening environments for Mild Cognitive Impairment: giving priority to elicited speech and language abilities},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on Cloud Systems},
        volume={1},
        number={4},
        publisher={EAI},
        journal_a={CS},
        year={2015},
        month={8},
        keywords={mild cognitive impairment, screening batteries, linguistic test, verbal fluency},
        doi={10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2015.258945}
    }
    
  • Sofia Segkouli
    Ioannis Paliokas
    Dimitrios Tzovaras
    Dimitrios Giakoumis
    Charalampos Karagiannidis
    Year: 2015
    Design of novel screening environments for Mild Cognitive Impairment: giving priority to elicited speech and language abilities
    CS
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2015.258945
Sofia Segkouli,*, Ioannis Paliokas1, Dimitrios Tzovaras1, Dimitrios Giakoumis1, Charalampos Karagiannidis1
  • 1: CERTH/ITI
*Contact email: sofia.segouli@gmail.com

Abstract

Recent cognitive decline screening batteries have highlighted the importance of language deficits related to semantic knowledge breakdown to reveal the incipient dementia. This paper proposes the introduction of novel enriched linguistic tests and examines the hypothesis that language can be a sensitive cognitive measure for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). A group of MCI and healthy elderly were administered a set of proposed linguistic tests. Performance measures were made on both groups to indicate that concrete verbal production deficits such as impaired verb fluency can distinguish the MCI from normal aging. In addition, it was found that even in cases where the MCI subjects preserved scores, language tests took significantly more time compared to healthy controls. These findings indicate that language could be a sensitive cognitive marker in preclinical stages of MCI.