ew 23(1):

Research Article

Impact and challenges to Adopting Electric Vehicles in developing countries – a case study in India

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  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/ew.2665,
        author={P Muthulakshmi and T Tamilarasi and Tanmay Tapan Banerji and S Albert Antony Raj and E Aarthi},
        title={Impact and challenges to Adopting Electric Vehicles in developing countries -- a case study in India},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on Energy Web},
        volume={10},
        number={1},
        publisher={EAI},
        journal_a={EW},
        year={2023},
        month={8},
        keywords={Benefits of Electric Vehicles, Challenges to adopting Electric vehicles, Future of EVs in India, EV case study, Case study, Transport, Electric Vehicles, EVs},
        doi={10.4108/ew.2665}
    }
    
  • P Muthulakshmi
    T Tamilarasi
    Tanmay Tapan Banerji
    S Albert Antony Raj
    E Aarthi
    Year: 2023
    Impact and challenges to Adopting Electric Vehicles in developing countries – a case study in India
    EW
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/ew.2665
P Muthulakshmi1, T Tamilarasi1,*, Tanmay Tapan Banerji1, S Albert Antony Raj1, E Aarthi1
  • 1: SRM Institute of Science and Technology
*Contact email: tt2252@srmist.edu.in

Abstract

Climate change is one of the current threats facing the world. Pollution is the primary factor causing climate change, in it, air pollution plays a major part. Almost all developed and developing countries emit a lot of greenhouse gases (GHG). The transportation sector is responsible for the majority of GHG emissions. Nowadays, almost all nations make an effort to lower CO2 emissions from transportation. India also has a strategy to achieve zero emissions through several programmes. When considering ways to lower GHG emissions from the transportation sector, electric vehicles (EVs) are the first choice that comes to mind. The main goal of this case study is to identify why and how India is having trouble launching EVs. India faces significant obstacles in the areas of infrastructure, electricity, battery technology, and consumer behaviour. India already has the infrastructure necessary for the general usage of fuel-powered automobiles. Suddenly changing to another technology and expecting to complete the requirement is a little problematic in emerging nations like India. The majority of electric vehicles (EVs) use lithium-ion batteries, and India is in a position to buy these batteries from other nations. As a result, the battery is a little expensive in India. Nothing is difficult to overcome the barriers compared to the benefits of EVs. Finally, this study makes several recommendations for eliminating the barriers to India's EV adoption.