2nd International ICST Conference on Performance Evaluation Methodologies and Tools

Research Article

Decentralized Control of Large-Scale Networks as a Game with Local Interactions: Cross-layer TCP/IP Optimization

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/valuetools.2007.1967,
        author={Vladimir Marbukh and Stephan Klink},
        title={Decentralized Control of Large-Scale Networks as a Game with Local Interactions: Cross-layer TCP/IP Optimization},
        proceedings={2nd International ICST Conference on Performance Evaluation Methodologies and Tools},
        proceedings_a={VALUETOOLS},
        year={2010},
        month={5},
        keywords={Distributed protocols optimization learning algorithms game theory TCP/IP OSPF randomized routing routing stability.},
        doi={10.4108/valuetools.2007.1967}
    }
    
  • Vladimir Marbukh
    Stephan Klink
    Year: 2010
    Decentralized Control of Large-Scale Networks as a Game with Local Interactions: Cross-layer TCP/IP Optimization
    VALUETOOLS
    ICST
    DOI: 10.4108/valuetools.2007.1967
Vladimir Marbukh1,*, Stephan Klink2,*
  • 1: National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8920, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8920, USA Tel: 1 301 975 2235
  • 2: National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 Bureau Drive Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8920, USA Tel: 1 301 975 2235
*Contact email: marbukh@nist.gov, klink@gmx.net

Abstract

Developing optimized distributed protocols for large-scale networks is a challenging problem due to scalability and stability concerns. Scalability concerns can be naturally addressed by interpreting distributed protocols as a non-cooperative game of local protocol components attempting to maximize their individual utilities. One of the difficulties in implementing this approach is developing adaptive algorithms capable of learning of the expected utilities and adjusting the corresponding control actions for the purpose of approaching the solution to the corresponding game, and thus optimization of the global system performance. It is known that the best response by each component to its expected utility may result in unstable behavior and deterioration of the overall performance. On an example of cross-layer optimization of a TCP/IP network, this paper discusses the possibility of avoiding these undesirable effects by allowing the control actions occasionally deviate from their best response values. Using simulations, the paper suggests that (a) sufficient level of randomness in route selection improves the network performance by eliminating the route flapping instability, (b) the optimal level of randomness keeps the network within the stability region in close proximity to the border of this region, and (c) it may be possible to optimize the network performance by adjusting the level of randomness.