2nd International ICST Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare

Research Article

User Acceptance of Pervasive Computing in Healthcare: Main Findings of two Case Studies

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/ICST.PERVASIVEHEALTH2008.2539,
        author={Mandy Scheermesser and Hannah Kosow and Asarnusch Rashid and Dr. Carsten Holtmann},
        title={User Acceptance of Pervasive Computing in Healthcare: Main Findings of two Case Studies},
        proceedings={2nd International ICST Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare},
        publisher={IEEE},
        proceedings_a={PERVASIVEHEALTH},
        year={2008},
        month={7},
        keywords={user acceptance case study usefulness usability data privacy},
        doi={10.4108/ICST.PERVASIVEHEALTH2008.2539}
    }
    
  • Mandy Scheermesser
    Hannah Kosow
    Asarnusch Rashid
    Dr. Carsten Holtmann
    Year: 2008
    User Acceptance of Pervasive Computing in Healthcare: Main Findings of two Case Studies
    PERVASIVEHEALTH
    ICST
    DOI: 10.4108/ICST.PERVASIVEHEALTH2008.2539
Mandy Scheermesser1,*, Hannah Kosow1,*, Asarnusch Rashid2,*, Dr. Carsten Holtmann2,*
  • 1: Institute for Futures Studies and Technology Assessment (IZT), Berlin; Germany
  • 2: Research Center for Information Technologies (FZI), Karlsruhe; Germany
*Contact email: m.scheermesser@izt.de, h.kosow@izt.de, rashid@fzi.de, holtmann@fzi.de

Abstract

The successful implementation of Pervasive Computing technologies in healthcare does not only depend on technical issues but also on acceptability and acceptance issues. In this paper we focus on factors that facilitate or inhibit user acceptance of Pervasive Computing in healthcare. We present selected findings of the research project ‘PerCoMed – Pervasive Computing in Healthcare’. The project is based on two case studies in pre- and post-clinical healthcare. In the first study, the potential of Pervasive Computing technologies for the treatment of acute cardiovascular diseases is investigated, in the second case study, the potential for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) is evaluated. A qualitative user acceptance analysis of the two case studies shows the following results: the main factor of user acceptance is the perceived medical usefulness. Furthermore, acceptance is strongly inhibited if data privacy or if subjective norms are violated. Usability only presents a decisive factor of acceptance if problems with usability reduce the perceived usefulness.