6th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare

Research Article

A Shared Interface to Improve Oncologist-Patient Communication

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2012.248711,
        author={Michael Gonzales and Laurel Riek},
        title={A Shared Interface to Improve Oncologist-Patient Communication},
        proceedings={6th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare},
        publisher={IEEE},
        proceedings_a={PERVASIVEHEALTH},
        year={2012},
        month={7},
        keywords={human computer interaction mobile technology clinical communication clinical engineering shared displays},
        doi={10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2012.248711}
    }
    
  • Michael Gonzales
    Laurel Riek
    Year: 2012
    A Shared Interface to Improve Oncologist-Patient Communication
    PERVASIVEHEALTH
    ICST
    DOI: 10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2012.248711
Michael Gonzales1,*, Laurel Riek1
  • 1: University of Notre Dame
*Contact email: mgonza14@nd.edu

Abstract

Patients recently diagnosed with cancer require information from their oncologist to further educate themselves about their disease, their course of action, side effects, and possible treatment plans and options. However, disagreements on the information discussed in these meetings indicate that patients and physicians leave with different ideas of the content of their discussions, leading to confusion on the part of the patient, and potentially leading to future problems in the course of treatment. With the increasing use of pervasive technologies in the medical environment, there is great potential to augment communication strategies in facilitating better care. In this paper, we propose a solution utilizing a shared mobile device to supplement patient-physician communication during cancer discussions. In particular, we present an application that personalizes the content presented on the device to the patient's diagnosis in a easy-to-understand language, rather than hard-to-understand medical terminology, and encourages patient-physician interaction on the main topical areas of a patient's diagnosis.