Envisaging the Future of Home Rehabilitation

Research Article

Delivering Group-Based Services to the Home via the Internet: Maximising Clinical and Social Benefits

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2011.246004,
        author={Andrea Taylor and David Godden and Angus Aitken and Judith Colligan and Richard Wilson},
        title={Delivering Group-Based Services to the Home via the Internet: Maximising Clinical and Social Benefits},
        proceedings={Envisaging the Future of Home Rehabilitation},
        publisher={IEEE},
        proceedings_a={EFHR},
        year={2012},
        month={4},
        keywords={Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD); health care; Internet physical exercise pulmonary rehabilitation rehabilitation; socialization videoconferencing},
        doi={10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2011.246004}
    }
    
  • Andrea Taylor
    David Godden
    Angus Aitken
    Judith Colligan
    Richard Wilson
    Year: 2012
    Delivering Group-Based Services to the Home via the Internet: Maximising Clinical and Social Benefits
    EFHR
    IEEE
    DOI: 10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2011.246004
Andrea Taylor1,*, David Godden2, Angus Aitken3, Judith Colligan4, Richard Wilson1
  • 1: Glasgow School of Art
  • 2: University of Aberdeen
  • 3: LifeScan
  • 4: NHS Highland
*Contact email: A.Taylor@gsa.ac.uk

Abstract

Delivering clinical services to people in their homes by means of technology may improve access for patients, but may compromise personal and social interactions with health professionals. Rehabilitation programs improve wellbeing and quality of life in a number of conditions, such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Ischemic Heart Disease and Stroke. Programs are conventionally delivered to groups, who undertake shared physical exercise, education and socialization. However, travel demands or poor health mean that many patients cannot participate. In a previous paper, we reported a new design for a group pulmonary rehabilitation program delivered to the home via the Internet and videoconferencing, and reported findings from the first feasibility trial performed with four patients. A second feasibility trial has been performed with three patients. Across both trials, the technology worked well, patients found the system easy to use, felt part of a group and felt safe. Satisfaction was high and clinical outcomes were similar to those in a conventional clinic-based program. Limited social interaction between participants occurred. In future, this could be enhanced by modifying the program schedule to dedicate time for socialization, and by allowing use of the system for interaction outwith the scheduled sessions. The technology could potentially be applied to other forms of rehabilitation such as Ischemic Heart Disease and Stroke.