5th International ICST Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Systems: Computing, Networking and Services

Research Article

Avoiding “Big Brother” Anxiety with Progressive Self-Management of Ubiquitous Computing Services

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/ICST.MOBIQUITOUS2008.3625,
        author={Kevin Feeney and Dave Lewis and Kris McGlinn and Declan O’Sullivan and Anne Holohan},
        title={Avoiding “Big Brother” Anxiety with Progressive Self-Management of Ubiquitous Computing Services},
        proceedings={5th International ICST Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Systems: Computing, Networking and Services},
        publisher={ICST},
        proceedings_a={MOBIQUITOUS},
        year={2010},
        month={5},
        keywords={Ubiquitous Computing Simulation Collaborative Management Privacy Management Policy Based Management.},
        doi={10.4108/ICST.MOBIQUITOUS2008.3625}
    }
    
  • Kevin Feeney
    Dave Lewis
    Kris McGlinn
    Declan O’Sullivan
    Anne Holohan
    Year: 2010
    Avoiding “Big Brother” Anxiety with Progressive Self-Management of Ubiquitous Computing Services
    MOBIQUITOUS
    ICST
    DOI: 10.4108/ICST.MOBIQUITOUS2008.3625
Kevin Feeney1,*, Dave Lewis1,*, Kris McGlinn1,*, Declan O’Sullivan1,*, Anne Holohan2,*
  • 1: Knowledge and Data Engineering Group, School of Computer Science and Statistics, Trinity College Dublin
  • 2: Department of Sociology, Trinity College Dublin
*Contact email: kefeeney@cs.tcd.ie, dlewis@cs.tcd.ie, mcglinnk@cs.tcd.ie, d.osullivan@cs.tcd.ie, aholohan@tcd.ie

Abstract

Despite the significant research over the last ten years, commercial ubiquitous computing environments and pervasive applications remain thin on the ground. This paper looks at the explosion in application creativity on the internet in recent years – the so-called ‘web 2.0’ – in order to identify the obstacles to application creativity in ubiquitous computing. Although technological and standardisation advances are progressively diminishing the scale of the technical problems in the domain, how to manage such applications in such a way so as to encourage user-acceptance remains an open question. It is a question that is particularly difficult due to the serious privacy concerns and the need for negotiated management of services between users due to physically embedded nature of sensor-driven applications. We describe a technical platform which is designed to allow users of ubiquitous computing environments to manage their own personal data and share it in a controlled way and describe an experimental programme which aims to measure the relationship between users’ perception of how much control they can exercise over their personal data and their acceptance of ubiquitous computing applications.