2nd International Conference on INtelligent TEchnologies for interactive enterTAINment

Research Article

User Loyalty and Online Communities: Why Members of Online Communities are not Faithful

Download113 downloads
  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/ICST.INTETAIN2008.2481,
        author={Petter Bae Brandtz\c{c}g and Jan Heim},
        title={User Loyalty and Online Communities: Why Members of Online Communities are not Faithful},
        proceedings={2nd International Conference on  INtelligent TEchnologies for interactive enterTAINment},
        publisher={ICST},
        proceedings_a={INTETAIN},
        year={2010},
        month={5},
        keywords={Online communities User loyalty Participation Design Trust Usability Social interaction.},
        doi={10.4108/ICST.INTETAIN2008.2481}
    }
    
  • Petter Bae Brandtzæg
    Jan Heim
    Year: 2010
    User Loyalty and Online Communities: Why Members of Online Communities are not Faithful
    INTETAIN
    ICST
    DOI: 10.4108/ICST.INTETAIN2008.2481
Petter Bae Brandtzæg1,*, Jan Heim2,*
  • 1: SINTEF Forskningsvn. 1 0314 Oslo, Norway + 47 92806546
  • 2: SINTEF Forskningsvn. 1 0314 Oslo, Norway + 47 22 06 75 69
*Contact email: pbb@sintef.no, jheim@sintef.no

Abstract

Online communities are getting increasingly important for several different user groups; at the same time, community members seem to lack loyalty, as they often change from one community to another or use their community less over time. To survive and thrive, online communities must meet members’ needs. By using qualitative data are from an extensive online survey of online community users and a representative sample of Internet users, 200 responses to an open question regarding community-loyalty was analyzed. Results show that there are 9 main reasons why community-users decrease in their participation over time or, in simple terms, stop using their online community: 1) Lack of interesting people/friends attending, 2) Low quality content, 3) Low usability, 4) Harassment and bullying 5) Time-consuming/isolating, 6) Low trust, 7) Over-commercialized, 8) Dissatisfaction with moderators and 9) Unspecified boring. The results, design implications and future research are discussed.