sg 15(7): e2

Research Article

Playable One-Switch Video Games for Children with Severe Motor Disabilities Based on GNomon

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  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/icst.intetain.2015.259620,
        author={Sebasti\^{a}n Aced L\^{o}pez and Fulvio Corno and Luigi De Russis},
        title={Playable One-Switch Video Games for Children with Severe Motor Disabilities Based on GNomon},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on Serious Games},
        volume={2},
        number={7},
        publisher={EAI},
        journal_a={SG},
        year={2015},
        month={8},
        keywords={accessible games, one-switch interaction, assistive technology, children with disabilities, single switch selection},
        doi={10.4108/icst.intetain.2015.259620}
    }
    
  • Sebastián Aced López
    Fulvio Corno
    Luigi De Russis
    Year: 2015
    Playable One-Switch Video Games for Children with Severe Motor Disabilities Based on GNomon
    SG
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/icst.intetain.2015.259620
Sebastián Aced López1,*, Fulvio Corno1, Luigi De Russis1
  • 1: Politecnico di Torino
*Contact email: sebastian.acedlopez@polito.it

Abstract

Being able to play games in early years is very important for the development of children. Even though, children with physical disabilities encounter several obstacles that exclude them from engaging in many popular games. In particular, children with severe motor disabilities that rely on one-switch interfaces for accessing electronic devices find dynamic video games completely unplayable. In this paper we present the development and evaluation of GNomon: a framework, based on the NOMON interaction modality, that enables the creation of dynamic one-switch games for children with severe motor disabilities. The framework was designed following a series of guidelines elicited in close collaboration with a team of speech therapists, physiotherapists and psychologists from one of the Local Health Agencies in Turin, Italy. Likewise, three mini games were developed for testing the playability of GNomon-based games. Finally, we conducted a series of trials with 8 children with severe motor disabilities assisted by the health agency, in which we found that all of them enjoyed playing the GNomon- based mini games and that 7 of them were able to interact and play autonomously.