3rd International ICST Conference on Body Area Networks

Research Article

Approaches to Self-Powered Biochemical Sensors for In- Vivo Applications

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/ICST.BODYNETS2008.2973,
        author={E.M Yeatman and D O’Hare and C. Dobson and E. Bitziou},
        title={Approaches to Self-Powered Biochemical Sensors for In- Vivo Applications},
        proceedings={3rd International ICST Conference on Body Area Networks},
        publisher={ICST},
        proceedings_a={BODYNETS},
        year={2010},
        month={5},
        keywords={Energy scavenging biosensors MEMS},
        doi={10.4108/ICST.BODYNETS2008.2973}
    }
    
  • E.M Yeatman
    D O’Hare
    C. Dobson
    E. Bitziou
    Year: 2010
    Approaches to Self-Powered Biochemical Sensors for In- Vivo Applications
    BODYNETS
    ICST
    DOI: 10.4108/ICST.BODYNETS2008.2973
E.M Yeatman1,*, D O’Hare2,*, C. Dobson2, E. Bitziou2
  • 1: Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ +44-20-7594-6204
  • 2: Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ +44-20-7594-5173
*Contact email: e.yeatman@imperial.ac.uk, d.ohare@imperial.ac.uk

Abstract

The requirement for electrical power is a major limitation in the development of biosensors for in-body applications. This paper considers motion powered energy harvesting devices for in-body use, showing that power levels are unlikely to exceed a few microwatts for devices of acceptable size. As a low power sensor, we are developing pH detectors based on metal-metal oxide electrodes, such as iridium oxide. The power requirement of these devices is considered, including signal conditioning, storage and transmission. A hybrid powering scheme of energy harvesting and wireless power delivery for data transmission is proposed.