Workshop UWBAN-2014

Research Article

A Wearable Hybrid IEEE 802.15.4-2011 Ultra-Wideband/Inertial Sensor Platform for Ambulatory Tracking

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/icst.bodynets.2014.258233,
        author={Michael Walsh and Salvatore Tedesco and Tingcong Ye and Brendan O'Flynn},
        title={A Wearable Hybrid IEEE 802.15.4-2011 Ultra-Wideband/Inertial Sensor Platform for Ambulatory Tracking},
        proceedings={Workshop UWBAN-2014},
        publisher={ICST},
        proceedings_a={UWBAN},
        year={2014},
        month={11},
        keywords={ieee 802154-2011 uwb inertial sensors mems fully coupled architecture hybrid system wearable},
        doi={10.4108/icst.bodynets.2014.258233}
    }
    
  • Michael Walsh
    Salvatore Tedesco
    Tingcong Ye
    Brendan O'Flynn
    Year: 2014
    A Wearable Hybrid IEEE 802.15.4-2011 Ultra-Wideband/Inertial Sensor Platform for Ambulatory Tracking
    UWBAN
    ICST
    DOI: 10.4108/icst.bodynets.2014.258233
Michael Walsh,*, Salvatore Tedesco1, Tingcong Ye1, Brendan O'Flynn1
  • 1: Tyndall National Institute
*Contact email: michael.walsh@tyndall.ie

Abstract

Ultra-Wideband (UWB) transceivers and low-cost micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) based inertial sensors are proving a promising hybrid combination for location specific wearable applications. While several hybrid systems have been proposed to date, current approaches consider inertial sensors and UWB as ad-hoc components working in isolation. As a result issues surrounding extensive infrastructure requirements, synchronization, and limitations associated with the mutual sharing of inertial data have arisen. In an attempt to address such limitations, this paper presents a fully-coupled architecture whereby standardised IEEE 802.15.4-2011 UWB is employed for both ranging and as a mechanism for exchanging inertial data between the nodes of a network. A proof-of-concept system is implemented and tested for a single ambulatory use case scenario. Basic fusion algorithms are employed and the preliminary results show the benefits of a fully coupled approach when compared with traditional standalone inertial navigation.