Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Law, Social Sciences, and Education, ICLSSE 2021, 09 September 2021, Singaraja, Bali, Indonesia

Research Article

Hegemony of the Ulu Apad Government System in Bali Aga Village (From Ancient Bali to Dutch Colonial Period)

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.9-9-2021.2313677,
        author={I Wayan  Pardi and I Made  Pageh},
        title={Hegemony of the Ulu Apad Government System in Bali  Aga Village (From Ancient Bali to Dutch  Colonial Period)},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Law, Social Sciences, and Education, ICLSSE 2021, 09 September 2021, Singaraja, Bali, Indonesia},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={ICLSSE},
        year={2021},
        month={12},
        keywords={history bali aga government system ulu apad},
        doi={10.4108/eai.9-9-2021.2313677}
    }
    
  • I Wayan Pardi
    I Made Pageh
    Year: 2021
    Hegemony of the Ulu Apad Government System in Bali Aga Village (From Ancient Bali to Dutch Colonial Period)
    ICLSSE
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.9-9-2021.2313677
I Wayan Pardi1,*, I Made Pageh1
  • 1: Universitas Pendidikan Ganesha
*Contact email: wayan.pardi@undiksha.ac.id

Abstract

The present study aims to analyze the origins of the Ulu Apad government system from old Bali to the Dutch colonial era. The theoretical frameworks underlying this study are village government system theory, hegemony theory, social organization theory, structural functionalism, and symbolic interaction theory. Meanwhile, the research method employed was the history writing method. The findings showed that Bali Aga Village was an old village inhabited by humans since prehistoric times and continued in the old Balinese era (VIII-XIV) up to the recently. Bali Aga village generally used the Ulu Apad government system. This system existed since the old Balinese period. After being conquered by Majapahit Kingdom (dated 1343 AD), there was hegemony in Bali towards the villages of Bali Aga by placing Majapahit/Gelgel representatives in the villages of Bali Aga. The study also discovered a change in Bali's power structure during the Dutch colonial rule. The king no longer occupied the top of the power hierarchy, but there was a controleur who supervised the king and was responsible to the assistant Resident, Resident, and Governor Generals of the Dutch East Indies as the top of the power hierarchy.