Proceedings of the First International Conference on Religion and Education 2019, INCRE, October 8 – 10, 2019, Bintaro, Indonesia

Research Article

Social Media and Student Online Aggression: A Case Study at Madrasah Aliyah Negeri (MAN) 2 Bogor City, West Java

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.8-10-2019.2294517,
        author={Mulyana  Mulyana},
        title={Social Media and Student Online Aggression: A Case Study at Madrasah Aliyah Negeri (MAN) 2 Bogor City, West Java},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the First International Conference on Religion and Education 2019, INCRE, October 8 -- 10, 2019, Bintaro, Indonesia},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={INCRE},
        year={2020},
        month={5},
        keywords={madrasah aliyah student online aggression school-family policies social media},
        doi={10.4108/eai.8-10-2019.2294517}
    }
    
  • Mulyana Mulyana
    Year: 2020
    Social Media and Student Online Aggression: A Case Study at Madrasah Aliyah Negeri (MAN) 2 Bogor City, West Java
    INCRE
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.8-10-2019.2294517
Mulyana Mulyana1,*
  • 1: Religious Research, Development and Training Agency, Ministry of Religious Affairs, Jl. Rawa Kuning No. 6, Pulogebang, Cakung, Jakarta Timur, Indonesia 13950
*Contact email: yana.litbangjkt@gmail.com

Abstract

This paper presents and discusses the results of a case study of student online aggression on social media. The study examines the following issues: (1) How frequent is online aggression among students? (2) What are forms of expression used to commit online aggression? (3) What are policies the school and student families have to prevent and reduce online aggression? This case study revealed that the frequency of social media-facilitated aggression varied according to the role of a student in aggression: as a witness, a victim or a perpetrator. The highest frequency of student online aggression in social media was reported by witnesses, followed by victims and perpetrators. Cursing/swearing words were the most frequent expression used by students while threatening words were the least frequent. Both the school and families have no specific policies to prevent and reduce student online aggression.