Proceedings of the 3rd Sriwijaya International Conference on Environmental Issues, SRICOENV 2022, October 5th, 2022, Palembang, South Sumatera, Indonesia

Research Article

Multipurpose Trees Species-Based Agroforestry at Ogan Komering Ulu Selatan, South Sumatera

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.5-10-2022.2328349,
        author={Bambang Tejo Premono and Sri  Lestari},
        title={Multipurpose Trees Species-Based Agroforestry at Ogan Komering Ulu Selatan, South Sumatera},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the 3rd Sriwijaya International Conference on Environmental Issues, SRICOENV 2022, October 5th, 2022, Palembang, South Sumatera, Indonesia},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={SRICOENV},
        year={2023},
        month={4},
        keywords={multipurpose trees species based agroforestry ogan komering ulu},
        doi={10.4108/eai.5-10-2022.2328349}
    }
    
  • Bambang Tejo Premono
    Sri Lestari
    Year: 2023
    Multipurpose Trees Species-Based Agroforestry at Ogan Komering Ulu Selatan, South Sumatera
    SRICOENV
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.5-10-2022.2328349
Bambang Tejo Premono1,*, Sri Lestari1
  • 1: Indonesia Research Center for Ecology and Ethnobiology, National Research and Innovation Agency of Indonesia (Badan Riset dan Inovasi Nasional/BRIN), Jl. Raya Jakarta-Bogor Km. 46, Cibinong, Bogor, 16911, West Java, Indonesia
*Contact email: bamb061@brin.go.id.com

Abstract

The practice of land cultivation with different plant species in the same land unit, known as agroforestry, has long been practiced by local communities in South Sumatra, including Ogan Komering Ulu Selatan. Coffee as the main crop is mixed with various multipurpose trees (MPTS) such as timber, fruit, animal feed and other products that have economic value and are used to meet livelihood needs. This practice provides a kind of safety net and a source of income for farmers destined for land optimization. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the role of multipurpose tree species in land management practices that are beneficial to farmers and the environment. Our preliminary results show that farmers in agroforestry have not practiced good land and crop management by selecting the type and number of MPTS plants planted considering the main crops grown. Farmers only see the empty space between plants or they do it without planning by using makeshift seeds, so the results are not optimal. Farmers only see the empty space between plants or do it without planning using makeshift seeds, so the results are not optimal. Capacity building and knowledge enhancement, as well as policy support, are needed to make MPTS-based agroforestry accessible to smallholder farmers.