Proceedings of the 4th BASA: International Seminar on Recent Language, Literature and Local Culture Studies, BASA, November 4th 2020, Solok, Indonesia

Research Article

The Shift of Politeness Systems in Javanese Society: A Case Study in Urban Communities in the Arek Cultural Area

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.4-11-2020.2314164,
        author={Edy  Jauhari and Dwi  Purnanto},
        title={The Shift of Politeness Systems in Javanese Society: A Case Study in Urban Communities in the Arek Cultural Area},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the 4th BASA: International Seminar on Recent Language, Literature and Local Culture Studies, BASA, November 4th 2020, Solok, Indonesia},
        publisher={ICST},
        proceedings_a={BASA},
        year={2021},
        month={12},
        keywords={the shift politeness systems javanese ethnicity arek culture},
        doi={10.4108/eai.4-11-2020.2314164}
    }
    
  • Edy Jauhari
    Dwi Purnanto
    Year: 2021
    The Shift of Politeness Systems in Javanese Society: A Case Study in Urban Communities in the Arek Cultural Area
    BASA
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.4-11-2020.2314164
Edy Jauhari1,*, Dwi Purnanto1
  • 1: Doctor of Law, Universitas Jayabaya, Jakarta, Indonesia
*Contact email: edy-j@fib.unair.ac.id

Abstract

This paper examines the shift of politeness system of Javanese society in the Arek cultural area, especially in urban community. The shift is seen based on differences in generations, namely the younger generation (adolescents) with age around 15-20 years (second generation) and the generation of their parents aged 45 years and over (the first generation). The data in this paper were collected through in-depth interviews with informants and analyzed using the Scollon and Scollon (2001) theory. The results of the data analysis show that the politeness system of the Javanese Arek cultural community is showing a shift process, from a hierarchical politeness system to symmetrical politeness system. The shift was triggered by the passive mastery of the second-generation karma level. When communicating with the first generation, the second generation tends not to use krama level, but Indonesian. This language is used to realize independent strategies so that it is as if Indonesian is a form of krama from Javanese at the ngoko level.