Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Gender, Culture and Society, ICGCS 2021, 30-31 August 2021, Padang, Indonesia

Research Article

Kinship System of Minangkabau Matrilineal Fisherman Society in The City of Padang

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.30-8-2021.2316305,
        author={Syahrizal  Syahrizal and Sri  Meiyenti},
        title={Kinship System of Minangkabau Matrilineal Fisherman Society in The City of Padang},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Gender, Culture and Society, ICGCS 2021, 30-31 August 2021, Padang, Indonesia},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={ICGCS},
        year={2022},
        month={4},
        keywords={fisherman gender kinship matrilineal minangkabau},
        doi={10.4108/eai.30-8-2021.2316305}
    }
    
  • Syahrizal Syahrizal
    Sri Meiyenti
    Year: 2022
    Kinship System of Minangkabau Matrilineal Fisherman Society in The City of Padang
    ICGCS
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.30-8-2021.2316305
Syahrizal Syahrizal1,*, Sri Meiyenti1
  • 1: Department of Anthropology, Social and Political, Universitas Andalas, Padang, Indonesia
*Contact email: syrizal81@gmail.com

Abstract

Minangkabau is famous for a matrilineal kinship system where lineage is based on maternal line. Women in a matrilineal society have a stronger position in the family and in decision making. The matrilineal kinship system in Minangkabau cannot be separated from the livelihood system that comes from agriculture. Minangkabau are known communal heirlooms; the inheritance is in the form of agricultural land such as rice fields or fields. Meanwhile, a small part of the Minangkabau community also earns a livelihood as fishermen. The livelihoods of fishing communities do not depend on agriculture, their source of livelihood depends on the expanse of the ocean; they earn their livelihood from fish catches. Fishermen know the name of their family clan, but they are not influenced by the kinship system in their daily life. Husbands and sons play more roles in the household as the economic backbone of the family and decision makers, meaning that in fishing communities there has been a shift in gender roles compared to gender roles in Minangkabau matrilineal society in general where women have a stronger position. Economically, the males play more and more important roles because since they are teenagers they have been able to sail to the middle of the sea to fish and make money for their families while girls are not yet able to work in that age range.