Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Gender, Culture and Society, ICGCS 2021, 30-31 August 2021, Padang, Indonesia

Research Article

Gender and Fatalism in The Reality of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Maternal Death in Minangkabau

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.30-8-2021.2316262,
        author={Yunarti  Yunarti and Afrizal  Afrizal and Helmi  Helmi and Defriman  Djafri},
        title={Gender and Fatalism in The Reality of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Maternal Death in Minangkabau},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Gender, Culture and Society, ICGCS 2021, 30-31 August 2021, Padang, Indonesia},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={ICGCS},
        year={2022},
        month={4},
        keywords={gender fatalism reality of maternity pregnancy maternal death},
        doi={10.4108/eai.30-8-2021.2316262}
    }
    
  • Yunarti Yunarti
    Afrizal Afrizal
    Helmi Helmi
    Defriman Djafri
    Year: 2022
    Gender and Fatalism in The Reality of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Maternal Death in Minangkabau
    ICGCS
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.30-8-2021.2316262
Yunarti Yunarti1,*, Afrizal Afrizal1, Helmi Helmi1, Defriman Djafri1
  • 1: Development Studies Doctoral Program – Universitas Andalas, Padang, Indonesia
*Contact email: yunartiandalas@soc.unand.ac.id

Abstract

Maternal death due to pregnancy and childbirth is a reality that leaves many concerns because a mother should not suffer or die because of carrying out reproductive functions. A woman's chances of dying or becoming disabled during pregnancy and childbirth are closely related to her social and economic status, cultural norms, the geographical remoteness of her residence, to the gender relations that surround her. These variables can directly or indirectly affect mothers' access to health services. They use observation techniques and semi-structural interviews guided by a list of questions to answer the research objectives. Results. Women decide matters relating to reproductive rights and events based on the attitude of their husbands and the experiences of senior women in the family. Educational and financial limitations reinforce this. There are restrictions on women's autonomy in decision-making, which affects their access to health services. The need to obtain health services during pregnancy considers the opinions of husbands, mothers-in-law, and mothers or grandmothers. Conclusion. Gender value systems and traditional experiences of senior women underlie women's procrastination towards their health needs. This attitude fosters an attitude of fatalism that makes women ignore the fulfillment of the demand for adequate health services.