Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Science, Education and Technology, ISET 2019, 29th June 2019, Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia

Research Article

The use of Japanese politeness markers by university students

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.29-6-2019.2290239,
        author={Rina  Supriatnaningsih and Rustono  Rustono and Edi  Astini and Tatang  Hariri},
        title={The use of Japanese politeness markers by university students },
        proceedings={Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Science, Education and Technology, ISET 2019, 29th June 2019, Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={ISET},
        year={2020},
        month={1},
        keywords={speaker’s expression of discernment keigo},
        doi={10.4108/eai.29-6-2019.2290239}
    }
    
  • Rina Supriatnaningsih
    Rustono Rustono
    Edi Astini
    Tatang Hariri
    Year: 2020
    The use of Japanese politeness markers by university students
    ISET
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.29-6-2019.2290239
Rina Supriatnaningsih1,*, Rustono Rustono1, Edi Astini2, Tatang Hariri3
  • 1: Universitas Negeri Semarang, Faculty of languages and arts, Indonesia
  • 2: Universitas Negeri Semarang, Graduate School, Indonesia
  • 3: Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
*Contact email: rinasupriatnaningsih@mail.unnes.ac.id

Abstract

Japanese has a respectful form or keigo in five types i.e. sonkeigo, kenjogo I, kenjogo II, teineigo, bikago. Teineigo politeness marker requires addition of -masu and desu to each sentence’s end. This study aims to describe politeness markers used by learners in their conversation with natives. The data were collected from 80 students of UNNES, UGM, UDINUS and UMY. Recording and interview were used to collect data in natural setting. The result shows that students generally used –desu and –masu. Speaker’s expression of discernment like tabun, tabun_ deshou, _to omoimasu were not preferred. Apparently most students contended that use of keigo from teineigo type was sufficient to show politeness since it was considered simple and easy. No previous studies examined keigo’ relation to speaker’s expression of discernment while it is vital in communication with natives. Therefore, speaker’s expression of discernment ought to be added into Japanese lesson.