Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Economic Management and Big Data Applications, ICEMBDA 2023, October 27–29, 2023, Tianjin, China

Research Article

What Contributes to the Increase in Homelessness? Does Housing drive Homelessness in California?

Download226 downloads
  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.27-10-2023.2342024,
        author={Hai  Song},
        title={What Contributes to the Increase in Homelessness? Does Housing drive Homelessness in California?},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Economic Management and Big Data Applications, ICEMBDA 2023, October 27--29, 2023, Tianjin, China},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={ICEMBDA},
        year={2024},
        month={1},
        keywords={housing homelessness in california income inequality unemployment population homelessness},
        doi={10.4108/eai.27-10-2023.2342024}
    }
    
  • Hai Song
    Year: 2024
    What Contributes to the Increase in Homelessness? Does Housing drive Homelessness in California?
    ICEMBDA
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.27-10-2023.2342024
Hai Song1,*
  • 1: George Washington University
*Contact email: Songhai663@gmail.com

Abstract

High housing prices in China are the main reason for the lack of home ownership in urban areas. This article researches that housing is contributing to the increase in homelessness in California. Desmond found that house price is a critical factor in explaining the rise in homelessness in the United States. Huang found high housing costs were a major factor in the homelessness crisis. Data from Zillow and the [18] Department of Housing and Urban Development present during 2008-2022, California house prices are highly correlated with the number of homeless people. This study finds that unemployment and GDP per capita are more highly correlated and statically significant with homelessness than housing prices, meanwhile, data from the [2] Bureau of Labor Statistics indicate the non-farm manufacturing labor force appears to be a significant predictor of homelessness in California. Data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis evidenced state personal income and state disposable income are not explicitly related to the homeless population.