Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Innovation in Education, Science, and Culture, ICIESC 2023, 24 October 2023, Medan, Indonesia

Research Article

Linguistic Landscape in Indonesia: What Public and Private Signs Reveal about Indonesia's Language Policy

Download34 downloads
  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.24-10-2023.2341914,
        author={Hesti  Fibriasari and Savitri  Rahmadany},
        title={Linguistic Landscape in Indonesia: What Public and Private  Signs Reveal about Indonesia's Language Policy},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Innovation in Education, Science, and Culture, ICIESC 2023, 24 October 2023, Medan, Indonesia},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={ICIESC},
        year={2024},
        month={1},
        keywords={linguistic landscape public signs private signs language  policy},
        doi={10.4108/eai.24-10-2023.2341914}
    }
    
  • Hesti Fibriasari
    Savitri Rahmadany
    Year: 2024
    Linguistic Landscape in Indonesia: What Public and Private Signs Reveal about Indonesia's Language Policy
    ICIESC
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.24-10-2023.2341914
Hesti Fibriasari1,*, Savitri Rahmadany2
  • 1: French Educations, Universitas Negeri Medan, Medan 20221, Indonesia
  • 2: English Applied Linguistics, Universitas Negeri Medan, Medan 20221, Indonesia
*Contact email: hestifibriasari@unimed.ac.id

Abstract

The salience and visibility of language in a given territory's linguistic landscape is a name used to describe the public area. Laut Dendang and Pancing, two areas in the Deli Serdang District, is the focus of this study’s language use in public and private signage. The qualitative research methodology served as the foundation. The study's data consisted of 30 images of billboards and signage of secondary government and privately held businesses. Digitally capturing signage allowed for the collection of all data. The result showed Deli Serdang District prefer to speak Indonesian (40%) over English (30%), both Indonesian and English (27%), and other languages (3%). Moreover, private signs tend to employ a wider variety of languages whereas public signs to utilize Bahasa more frequently. So, to maintain Bahasa as the official tongue of the nation, the government needs to continue to educate the populace on language policy.