phat 17(11): e1

Research Article

Self-rehabilitation of acquired brain injury patients including neglect and attention deficit disorder with a tablet game in a clinical setting

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  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/eai.18-7-2017.152895,
        author={Hendrik Knoche and Kasper Hald and Dorte Richter and Helle Rovsing M\`{u}ller J\`{u}rgensen},
        title={Self-rehabilitation of acquired brain injury patients including neglect and attention deficit disorder with a tablet game in a clinical setting},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on Pervasive Health and Technology},
        volume={3},
        number={11},
        publisher={EAI},
        journal_a={PHAT},
        year={2017},
        month={7},
        keywords={Self-rehabilitation; game performance; patient insight; stroke; neglect classification; input hand classification; whack-a-mole},
        doi={10.4108/eai.18-7-2017.152895}
    }
    
  • Hendrik Knoche
    Kasper Hald
    Dorte Richter
    Helle Rovsing Møller Jørgensen
    Year: 2017
    Self-rehabilitation of acquired brain injury patients including neglect and attention deficit disorder with a tablet game in a clinical setting
    PHAT
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.18-7-2017.152895
Hendrik Knoche1,*, Kasper Hald1, Dorte Richter2, Helle Rovsing Møller Jørgensen2
  • 1: Department of Media Technology, Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg, DK
  • 2: Sygehus Vendsyssel, Neuroenhed Nord, Nørregade 77, 9700 Brønderslev, DK
*Contact email: hk@create.aau.dk

Abstract

We designed and evaluated a whack-a-mole (WAM) style game (see Figure 1) in a clinical randomized controlled trial (RCT) with reminder-assisted but self-initiated use over the period of a month with 43 participants from a post-lesion pool. While game play did not moderate rehabilitative progress indices of standard neuropsychological control tests, it did significantly improve in-game performance when compared to the control group. Its performance indicators and interaction data were highly accurate in predicting neglect and which hand the patients used for input. Patients found playing beneficial to their rehabilitation and attributed gains in the attention training properties of the game. The game showed potential for bedside assessment, insight support, and motivation by providing knowledge about rehabilitative progress.