Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Engineering, Science, and Commerce, ICESC 2019, 18-19 October 2019, Labuan Bajo, Nusa Tenggara Timur, Indonesia

Research Article

A Modified Halogen Solar Simulator

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.18-10-2019.2289851,
        author={Julius  Tanesab and Muchammad  Ali and Gratia  Parera and James  Mauta and Rusman  Sinaga},
        title={A Modified Halogen Solar Simulator},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Engineering, Science, and Commerce, ICESC 2019, 18-19 October 2019, Labuan Bajo, Nusa Tenggara Timur, Indonesia},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={ICESC},
        year={2019},
        month={12},
        keywords={solar simulator halogen lamp pv performance},
        doi={10.4108/eai.18-10-2019.2289851}
    }
    
  • Julius Tanesab
    Muchammad Ali
    Gratia Parera
    James Mauta
    Rusman Sinaga
    Year: 2019
    A Modified Halogen Solar Simulator
    ICESC
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.18-10-2019.2289851
Julius Tanesab1,*, Muchammad Ali1, Gratia Parera1, James Mauta1, Rusman Sinaga1
  • 1: Politeknik Negeri Kupang
*Contact email: julius_halan@yahoo.co.id

Abstract

Many researches on the low-cost solar simulators for PV module performance testing have been carried out. However, it was found that the previous designs require improvements to address the needs of PV module performance test equipment specifically for dust impact experiments. As the dust material attaching on the surface of PV module is removed easily during experiments, module position should be kept to face upwards. This study reported results of a solar simulator developed for testing characteristics of PV modules including those contaminated with dust. Test results showed that the solar simulator worked well. Voltage input and distance of halogen lamps can be adjusted to produce various light intensities received by the examined PV module. Relative difference of maximum power output (Pmax) of an examined PV module exposed to the Sun and the developed solar simulator was about 33%. The large difference was likely contributed to human errors and non-standard equipment applied during the study