ct 21(26): e4

Research Article

Can’t see the Forest for the Trees: Perceiving Realism of Procedural Generated Trees in First-Person Games

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  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/eai.16-3-2021.169029,
        author={Peter H\`{u}rdum J\c{c}ger and Niels Christian Nilsson and George Palamas},
        title={Can’t see the Forest for the Trees: Perceiving Realism of Procedural Generated Trees in First-Person Games},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on Creative Technologies},
        volume={8},
        number={26},
        publisher={EAI},
        journal_a={CT},
        year={2021},
        month={3},
        keywords={Procedural Content Generation, procedural trees, cognitive maps, Navigation in Virtual Environments, Ecological Simulator, self localization},
        doi={10.4108/eai.16-3-2021.169029}
    }
    
  • Peter Hørdum Jæger
    Niels Christian Nilsson
    George Palamas
    Year: 2021
    Can’t see the Forest for the Trees: Perceiving Realism of Procedural Generated Trees in First-Person Games
    CT
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.16-3-2021.169029
Peter Hørdum Jæger1, Niels Christian Nilsson1, George Palamas1,*
  • 1: Aalborg University Copenhagen, A. C. Meyers Vænge 15, 2450 København, Denmark
*Contact email: palamas@artefactdesign.gr

Abstract

This paper explores a bio-mimetic approach for procedurally generated trees and forests, emphasizing the need to deliver a unique gameplay experience. For this study a tree growth simulator was developed, based on a set of growth factors, and an ecological model used for the placement of the trees. The contribution of the proposed scheme is two-fold. In a micro level analyzes the user’s perceived realism of a single tree, and on a macro level the user’s experience in the context of navigation performance in a forest. Results of a user study indicate that the perceived appearance of the trees was mainly affected by the player’s previous experience and expectations. The player’s ability to navigate in a forest was affected both by growth factors of the trees and the distribution model used to generate the forest. Moreover, the participants reported the that distinct visual cues enhanced their navigation and orientation in the forest.