Proceedings of the First International Conference on Democracy and Social Transformation, ICON-DEMOST 2021, September 15, 2021, Semarang, Indonesia

Research Article

Muslim Women and Everyday Environmentalism in Post-Covid Indonesia: Shifting the Canon?

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.15-9-2021.2315562,
        author={June  Cahyaningtyas and Wening  Udasmoro and Dicky  Sofjan},
        title={Muslim Women and Everyday Environmentalism in Post-Covid Indonesia: Shifting the Canon?},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the First International Conference on Democracy and Social Transformation, ICON-DEMOST 2021, September 15, 2021, Semarang, Indonesia},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={ICON-DEMOST},
        year={2022},
        month={2},
        keywords={everyday environmentalism; muslim women; indonesia; emic; etic},
        doi={10.4108/eai.15-9-2021.2315562}
    }
    
  • June Cahyaningtyas
    Wening Udasmoro
    Dicky Sofjan
    Year: 2022
    Muslim Women and Everyday Environmentalism in Post-Covid Indonesia: Shifting the Canon?
    ICON-DEMOST
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.15-9-2021.2315562
June Cahyaningtyas1,*, Wening Udasmoro2, Dicky Sofjan3
  • 1: Inter-Religious Studies, Gadjah Mada University. International Relations, UPN Veteran Yogyakarta
  • 2: Faculty of Culture, Gadjah Mada University
  • 3: Inter-Religious Studies, Gadjah Mada University
*Contact email: june.cahyaningtyas@gmail.com

Abstract

Everyday environmentalism in Indonesia is inseparable from the presence of some Muslim women whose appearance in social media help set the idea and the practice for sustainable living. Having attracted many housewives to follow their footsteps, existing studies, departing from ecofeminism, have underlined their impactful presence. While an etic evaluation might be pertinent to analyse how much this increasing public role able to improve their stake, an emic reading is no less important to understand their own interpretation. The study argues that a contextual reading of Muslim women’s engagement with everyday environmentalism in Indonesia cannot be undertaken by dissuading their view of religiousness, while permeating it with a prescribed gendered analysis provided by ecofeminism. But instead of rejecting the latter, the paper delves into the dynamic interplay of emic and etic rendition to the place of women, environmentalism in everyday life, and religion in Indonesia. Employing ethnography, the study found multiple layers of meaning of religiousness, showing their complicated relation with religious institution and an uneasy alliance with any given feminist ideas.