phat 22(30): e4

Research Article

Increasing motivation for cancer treatment adherence in children through a mobile educational game: a pilot study

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  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/eai.15-2-2022.173453,
        author={Carmen Chai Wang Er and Lau Bee Theng and Mark Tee Kit Tsun and Abdullah Al Mahmud},
        title={Increasing motivation for cancer treatment adherence in children through a mobile educational game: a pilot study},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on Pervasive Health and Technology},
        volume={8},
        number={30},
        publisher={EAI},
        journal_a={PHAT},
        year={2022},
        month={2},
        keywords={childhood cancer, e-learning, mobile application, serious game, treatment adherence, virtual pet},
        doi={10.4108/eai.15-2-2022.173453}
    }
    
  • Carmen Chai Wang Er
    Lau Bee Theng
    Mark Tee Kit Tsun
    Abdullah Al Mahmud
    Year: 2022
    Increasing motivation for cancer treatment adherence in children through a mobile educational game: a pilot study
    PHAT
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.15-2-2022.173453
Carmen Chai Wang Er1,*, Lau Bee Theng1, Mark Tee Kit Tsun1, Abdullah Al Mahmud2
  • 1: Swinburne University of Technology - Sarawak Campus, Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia
  • 2: Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
*Contact email: cchai@swinburne.edu.my

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: It is crucial to educate childhood cancer patients (CCPs) about their illness and motivate them for cancer treatment and treatment side-effects management.

OBJECTIVES: This paper describes the design, development and pilot evaluation of the proposed serious game intervention with CCPs in Malaysia.

METHODS: A single-centre, single-arm intervention was conducted with CCPs (n=8). Surveys were done pre-test and post-test.

RESULTS: The Protection Motivation Theory was used to measure the participants' motivation. Self-reported surveys with CCPs and caregiver dyads showed a significant increase in participants’ intention to use cancer treatment. Although the increase in the intention to use daily self-care and cancer knowledge survey scores was not substantial, the post-test caregivers' feedback revealed that the game was beneficial for their children.

CONCLUSION: Early results of the study have shown the intervention’s potential to boost the knowledge and motivations of CCPs.