cc 16(7): e2

Research Article

Impact on procurement and training by research on the interaction design of medical devices

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  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/eai.14-10-2015.2261766,
        author={Paul Lee and Laura Meagher and Paul Curzon},
        title={Impact on procurement and training by research on the interaction design of medical devices},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on Collaborative Computing},
        volume={2},
        number={7},
        publisher={ACM},
        journal_a={CC},
        year={2015},
        month={12},
        keywords={safety, medical devices, interaction design, procurement, training},
        doi={10.4108/eai.14-10-2015.2261766}
    }
    
  • Paul Lee
    Laura Meagher
    Paul Curzon
    Year: 2015
    Impact on procurement and training by research on the interaction design of medical devices
    CC
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.14-10-2015.2261766
Paul Lee1, Laura Meagher2, Paul Curzon3,*
  • 1: Morriston Hospital, Swansea
  • 2: Technology Development Group
  • 3: Queen Mary University of London
*Contact email: p.curzon@qmul.ac.uk

Abstract

We present a case study of how research can influence practice in the procurement of healthcare technology based on the CHI+MED project. CHI+MED is concerned with interaction design and the safety of medical devices. It has combined scientific research on underlying human error, and the development of engineering tools and techniques based on this science. It has also included a strong stakeholder engagement strand, aiming to ensure that the research has impact. In particular CHI+MED research has directly informed a UKP 2.5 million procurement decision at a Welsh health board, leading to safer equipment being bought. It provided the evidence to support one kind of device being rated more highly due to its ease of safe use. Our research is also the basis of a new approach to evidence-based procurement based on proactively analysing error logs of existing devices. The logs are analysed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of devices to provide evidence for future decisions. It has also contributed to a programme to ensure software that helps reduce errors is used. CHI+MED research has also fed into training programmes. Our research is actively preventing patients being unnecessarily harmed and also saving staff time from not having to work with hard to use technology, so ultimately saving money.