ct 20(23): e5

Research Article

Pathways to Live Visuals in Dance Performances: a Quantitative Audience Study

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  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/eai.13-7-2018.163987,
        author={Raul Masu and Nuno N. Correia},
        title={Pathways to Live Visuals in Dance Performances: a Quantitative Audience Study},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on Creative Technologies},
        volume={7},
        number={23},
        publisher={EAI},
        journal_a={CT},
        year={2020},
        month={4},
        keywords={audience study, dance, live visuals, interaction design},
        doi={10.4108/eai.13-7-2018.163987}
    }
    
  • Raul Masu
    Nuno N. Correia
    Year: 2020
    Pathways to Live Visuals in Dance Performances: a Quantitative Audience Study
    CT
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.13-7-2018.163987
Raul Masu1,*, Nuno N. Correia2
  • 1: FCT/NOVA University of Lisbon and ITI/LARSyS
  • 2: University of Greenwich and ITI/LARSyS
*Contact email: raul.masu@m-iti.org

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: We present an audience study investigating the impact of different technologies to create visuals in dance performances.

OBJECTIVES: We investigated four conditions: motion capture, sensors, camera image, and minimal interaction; and four variables: how much did the audience perceive a connection between the body and the visuals; the visuals as merely copying the dancer; how much distracting were the visuals; and how much did the audience enjoy the visuals.

METHODS: We used a questionnaire to collect data. We analyzed it using Friedman’s test, and Spearman’s correlation test.

RESULTS: The audience perceived a stronger connection in the camera condition, but in the same condition, visuals tend to be merely copying the dancer. We also suggest that the perceived connection has a positive correlation with enjoyment, while distraction has a negative correlation.

CONCLUSION: Our results help to highlight the impact that different technology have on live visuals for dance.