Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Gender Equality and Ecological Justice, GE2J 2019, 10-11 July 2019, Salatiga, Central Java, Indonesia

Research Article

Hidden Narratives: The Struggle of Sumba Women in Saving Fresh Water

Download461 downloads
  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.10-7-2019.2298886,
        author={Titiek Kartika Hendrastiti and Siti  Kusujiarti},
        title={Hidden Narratives: The Struggle of Sumba Women in Saving Fresh Water},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Gender Equality and Ecological Justice, GE2J 2019, 10-11 July 2019, Salatiga, Central Java, Indonesia},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={GE2J},
        year={2020},
        month={8},
        keywords={postcolonial feminist ethnography sustainable water governance sumba women hidden narration women‟s agency},
        doi={10.4108/eai.10-7-2019.2298886}
    }
    
  • Titiek Kartika Hendrastiti
    Siti Kusujiarti
    Year: 2020
    Hidden Narratives: The Struggle of Sumba Women in Saving Fresh Water
    GE2J
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.10-7-2019.2298886
Titiek Kartika Hendrastiti1,*, Siti Kusujiarti2
  • 1: University of Bengkulu
  • 2: Warren Wilson College
*Contact email: titiek_kartika@unib.ac.id

Abstract

This study critically analyzes women‟s agency in protesting gold mining corporation in Central Sumba, Indonesia. Like other mining areas, the gold mining activities were rejected by the indigenous inhabitants. Narratives of the anti-mining are many, but they did not record the women's involvement. The research applies a postcolonial feminist ethnography method. The imbalance of power relations places women‟s narratives as hidden. The postcolonial feminist ethnography reveals the hidden struggle of indigenous women; it uncovers various messages of life protection and conservation. Their experience reflects their knowledge of local harmony and resilience. It suggests that women have capacity to clearly explain the root of their anti-mining acts. Women hold the legacy of knowledge to protect natural resources from their female ancestors through spoken language (tutur). Women are not worried about the depletion of gold minerals, but they are more concerned about losing their water sources. Caring for a spring water means establishing themselves as agents for conserving natural resources.