Proceedings of the 19th Annual International Conference on Islamic Studies, AICIS 2019, 1-4 October 2019, Jakarta, Indonesia

Research Article

Online Religious Radicalism: A Global Proxy Warfare Model in Indonesia

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/eai.1-10-2019.2291690,
        author={M  Affan and A  Thohir},
        title={Online Religious Radicalism: A Global Proxy Warfare Model in Indonesia},
        proceedings={Proceedings of the 19th Annual International Conference on Islamic Studies, AICIS 2019, 1-4 October 2019, Jakarta, Indonesia},
        publisher={EAI},
        proceedings_a={AICIS},
        year={2020},
        month={2},
        keywords={online radicalism proxy war security threats millennial muslims indonesia},
        doi={10.4108/eai.1-10-2019.2291690}
    }
    
  • M Affan
    A Thohir
    Year: 2020
    Online Religious Radicalism: A Global Proxy Warfare Model in Indonesia
    AICIS
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.1-10-2019.2291690
M Affan1,*, A Thohir1
  • 1: UIN Sunan Gunung Djati, Bandung
*Contact email: mehmed.affan@gmail.com

Abstract

The rapid development of information and communication technology, proxy war methods have become easier to apply because proxy-forming narratives can be published widely at low cost only through the internet. This has been proven to be run by IS (Islamic State) terror groups that carry out proxy wars throughout the world simply by spreading propaganda narratives of religious radicalism through the internet. Based on such threats, the following article will discuss online religious radicalism as a proxy war model in Indonesia. This study aims to explain how the content of religious radicalism can become a form of global proxy war that threatens Indonesia. The results of this study are expected to contribute ideas in the discourse on radicalism and counter radicalism in a security perspective. The method used in the study is a literature research method both offline and online. From the research conducted, it was concluded that religious radicalism content published online aims to establish a rigid, aggressive and offensive religious understanding of Indonesian Millennial Muslims. With the formation of such understanding, Indonesian Millennial Muslims are directed to become proxies for narrative disseminators in achieving their goals in Indonesia, such as the formation of the Caliphate, the establishment of an Islamic state or running a lone wolf attack. Thus, the presence of religious radicalism on the internet is actually a form of global proxy war against Indonesia.