Wireless Mobile Communication and Healthcare. Second International ICST Conference, MobiHealth 2011, Kos Island, Greece, October 5-7, 2011. Revised Selected Papers

Research Article

An Ultra-Low Power MAC Protocol for In-body Medical Implant Networks

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-642-29734-2_2,
        author={Ashutosh Ghildiyal and Balwant Godara and Amara Amara},
        title={An Ultra-Low Power MAC Protocol for In-body Medical Implant Networks},
        proceedings={Wireless Mobile Communication and Healthcare. Second International ICST Conference, MobiHealth 2011, Kos Island, Greece, October 5-7, 2011. Revised Selected Papers},
        proceedings_a={MOBIHEALTH},
        year={2012},
        month={10},
        keywords={Biomedical implants Body area networks IEEE 802.15.6 Media Access Layer Power optimization},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-642-29734-2_2}
    }
    
  • Ashutosh Ghildiyal
    Balwant Godara
    Amara Amara
    Year: 2012
    An Ultra-Low Power MAC Protocol for In-body Medical Implant Networks
    MOBIHEALTH
    Springer
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-29734-2_2
Ashutosh Ghildiyal1,*, Balwant Godara2,*, Amara Amara2,*
  • 1: Parc d’affaires noveos
  • 2: Institut Supérieur d’Electronique de Paris
*Contact email: ashutosh.ghildiyal@sorin.com, bgodara@isep.fr, amara.amara@isep.fr

Abstract

We present an ultra low power MAC designed for battery-operated subcutaneous implants. Our MAC protocol addresses special communication needs of medical implants like latency, emergency messaging, priority etc., while maintaining an extremely low power-consumption profile. The paper presents the design choices made for a practical cardiac intra-body network and exploits the inherent asymmetries of the network to reduce power consumption. We present a new scheme for deriving analytically the power-optimised TDMA frame parameters like beacon interval and discuss a hardware solution to manage synchronisation overhead. Equations for deriving the duty-cycling efficiency are presented and the packet error rate is calculated for the in-body wireless channel. Our results and simulations show that our protocol is several times more efficient than the state of the art ultra low power protocols. Thus, we illustrate and validate our solution for a very real use case: cardiac networks. However, our new methodology can be applied for any Body Area Network. In this sense, our paper presents a ‘universal’ solution.