Ad Hoc Networks. First International Conference, ADHOCNETS 2009, Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, September 22-25, 2009. Revised Selected Papers

Research Article

Tracking a Vehicle Moving in a Wireless Sensor Network

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-642-11723-7_29,
        author={Fernand Cohen and Salah Abushariefeh and Gregory Bruton and Marcus Matthews and Kuriakose Varghese},
        title={Tracking a Vehicle Moving in a Wireless Sensor Network},
        proceedings={Ad Hoc Networks. First International Conference, ADHOCNETS 2009, Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, September 22-25, 2009. Revised Selected Papers},
        proceedings_a={ADHOCNETS},
        year={2012},
        month={7},
        keywords={Wireless sensor networks target detection target tracking motion update cluster head},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-642-11723-7_29}
    }
    
  • Fernand Cohen
    Salah Abushariefeh
    Gregory Bruton
    Marcus Matthews
    Kuriakose Varghese
    Year: 2012
    Tracking a Vehicle Moving in a Wireless Sensor Network
    ADHOCNETS
    Springer
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-11723-7_29
Fernand Cohen1,*, Salah Abushariefeh1, Gregory Bruton1, Marcus Matthews1, Kuriakose Varghese1
  • 1: DREXEL UNIVERSITY
*Contact email: fscohen@coe.drexel.edu

Abstract

This paper deals with the problem of tracking a radio controlled vehicle (RCV) fitted with LED’s moving within a wireless sensor network (WSN). The WSN test bed is made up of a number of Mica2 motes with fixed and know locations and equipped with light sensors. To reduce the overload of communications, power consumption, and allow for scalability, the network is divided into clusters, where members of each cluster communicate with the designated cluster head, which in turn communicates with a sink or another cluster head. When the RCV moves within the motes, a mote in the immediate vicinity of the vehicle becomes ‘hot’, i.e., its intensity exceeds a predetermined threshold, and it relays to its cluster head its ID and the intensity of its reading. The cluster head, in turns, establishes the location of ‘hottest’ mote, and uses this information to dynamically update the new location of the vehicle along with its velocity and acceleration.