Collaborative Computing: Networking, Applications and Worksharing. 4th International Conference, CollaborateCom 2008, Orlando, FL, USA, November 13-16, 2008, Revised Selected Papers

Research Article

A Battery-Aware Algorithm for Supporting Collaborative Applications

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-642-03354-4_44,
        author={Sami Rollins and Cheryl Chang-Yit},
        title={A Battery-Aware Algorithm for Supporting Collaborative Applications},
        proceedings={Collaborative Computing: Networking, Applications and Worksharing. 4th International Conference, CollaborateCom 2008, Orlando, FL, USA, November 13-16, 2008, Revised Selected Papers},
        proceedings_a={COLLABORATECOM},
        year={2012},
        month={5},
        keywords={},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-642-03354-4_44}
    }
    
  • Sami Rollins
    Cheryl Chang-Yit
    Year: 2012
    A Battery-Aware Algorithm for Supporting Collaborative Applications
    COLLABORATECOM
    Springer
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-03354-4_44
Sami Rollins1,*, Cheryl Chang-Yit1,*
  • 1: University of San Francisco
*Contact email: srollins@cs.usfca.edu, cchangyit@cs.usfca.edu

Abstract

Battery-powered devices such as laptops, cell phones, and MP3 players are becoming ubiquitous. There are several significant ways in which the ubiquity of battery-powered technology impacts the field of collaborative computing. First, applications such as collaborative data gathering, become possible. Also, existing applications that depend on collaborating devices to maintain the system infrastructure must be reconsidered. Fundamentally, the problem lies in the fact that collaborative applications often require end-user computing devices to perform tasks that happen in the background and are not directly advantageous to the user. In this work, we seek to better understand how laptop users use the batteries attached to their devices and analyze a battery-aware alternative to Gnutella’s ultrapeer selection algorithm. Our algorithm provides insight into how system maintenance tasks can be allocated to battery-powered nodes. The most significant result of our study indicates that a large portion of laptop users can participate in system maintenance without sacrificing any of their battery. These results show great promise for existing collaborative applications as well as new applications, such as collaborative data gathering, that rely upon battery-powered devices.