Forensics in Telecommunications, Information and Multimedia. Second International Conference, e-Forensics 2009, Adelaide, Australia, January 19-21, 2009, Revised Selected Papers

Research Article

The Development of a Generic Framework for the Forensic Analysis of SCADA and Process Control Systems

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-642-02312-5_9,
        author={Jill Slay and Elena Sitnikova},
        title={The Development of a Generic Framework for the Forensic Analysis of SCADA and Process Control Systems},
        proceedings={Forensics in Telecommunications, Information and Multimedia. Second International Conference, e-Forensics 2009, Adelaide, Australia, January 19-21, 2009, Revised Selected Papers},
        proceedings_a={E-FORENSICS},
        year={2012},
        month={5},
        keywords={SCADA process control systems security forensics},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-642-02312-5_9}
    }
    
  • Jill Slay
    Elena Sitnikova
    Year: 2012
    The Development of a Generic Framework for the Forensic Analysis of SCADA and Process Control Systems
    E-FORENSICS
    Springer
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-02312-5_9
Jill Slay1,*, Elena Sitnikova1
  • 1: University of South Australia
*Contact email: Jill.slay@unisa.edu.au

Abstract

There is continuing interest in researching generic security architectures and strategies for managing SCADA and process control systems. Documentation from various countries on IT security does now begin to recommendations for security controls for (federal) information systems which include connected process control systems. Little or no work exists in the public domain which takes a big picture approach to the issue of developing a generic or generalisable approach to SCADA and process control system forensics. The discussion raised in this paper is that before one can develop solutions to the problem of SCADA forensics, a good understanding of the forensic computing process, and the range of technical and procedural issues subsumed with in this process, need to be understood, and also agreed, by governments, industry and academia.