Wireless Mobile Communication and Healthcare. 6th International Conference, MobiHealth 2016, Milan, Italy, November 14-16, 2016, Proceedings

Research Article

Self-Powered Implantable Electromagnetic Device for Cardiovascular System Monitoring Through Arterial Wall Deformation

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-319-58877-3_1,
        author={Grigorios Karageorgos and Christos Manopoulos and Sokrates Tsangaris and Konstantina Nikita},
        title={Self-Powered Implantable Electromagnetic Device for Cardiovascular System Monitoring Through Arterial Wall Deformation},
        proceedings={Wireless Mobile Communication and Healthcare. 6th International Conference, MobiHealth 2016, Milan, Italy, November 14-16, 2016, Proceedings},
        proceedings_a={MOBIHEALTH},
        year={2017},
        month={6},
        keywords={Self-powered Implantable devices Cardiovascular system Arterial wall deformation Blood pressure monitoring Energy harvesting},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-319-58877-3_1}
    }
    
  • Grigorios Karageorgos
    Christos Manopoulos
    Sokrates Tsangaris
    Konstantina Nikita
    Year: 2017
    Self-Powered Implantable Electromagnetic Device for Cardiovascular System Monitoring Through Arterial Wall Deformation
    MOBIHEALTH
    Springer
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-58877-3_1
Grigorios Karageorgos1, Christos Manopoulos1, Sokrates Tsangaris1, Konstantina Nikita1,*
  • 1: National Technical University of Athens
*Contact email: knikita@ece.ntua.gr

Abstract

In this paper, we present the potential of a device, originally designed for energy harvesting, to form a self-powered medical implant that monitors critical parameters of the cardiovascular system. The original design consists of a coil that deforms with an artery inside magnetic field applied by two permanent magnets. We fabricated the device, and developed appropriate experimental setup that simulates blood flow and arterial wall pulsation with adjustable frequency and pressure. The voltage and power of the moving coil, as well as the pressure inside the tube simulating the pulsating artery were measured at different frequencies. In-vitro experiments and theoretical analysis showed that the voltage induced across the coil’s terminals can provide information on blood pressure, heart rate, arterial wall deformation and velocity.