Nature of Computation and Communication. International Conference, ICTCC 2014, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, November 24-25, 2014, Revised Selected Papers

Research Article

Sensing Urban Density Using Mobile Phone GPS Locations: A Case Study of Odaiba Area, Japan

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-319-15392-6_15,
        author={Teerayut Horanont and Santi Phithakkitnukoon and Ryosuke Shibasaki},
        title={Sensing Urban Density Using Mobile Phone GPS Locations: A Case Study of Odaiba Area, Japan},
        proceedings={Nature of Computation and Communication. International Conference, ICTCC 2014, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, November 24-25, 2014, Revised Selected Papers},
        proceedings_a={ICTCC},
        year={2015},
        month={2},
        keywords={GPS Mobile sensing Urban density Mobile phone locations Pervasive computing Urban computing},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-319-15392-6_15}
    }
    
  • Teerayut Horanont
    Santi Phithakkitnukoon
    Ryosuke Shibasaki
    Year: 2015
    Sensing Urban Density Using Mobile Phone GPS Locations: A Case Study of Odaiba Area, Japan
    ICTCC
    ICST
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-15392-6_15
Teerayut Horanont,*, Santi Phithakkitnukoon1,*, Ryosuke Shibasaki2,*
  • 1: Chiang Mai University
  • 2: The University of Tokyo
*Contact email: teerayut@siit.tu.ac.th, santi@eng.cmu.ac.th, shiba@csis.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Abstract

Today, the urban computing scenario is emerging as a concept where humans can be used as a component to probe city dynamics. The urban activities can be described by the close integration of ICT devices and humans. In the quest for creating sustainable livable cities, the deep understanding of urban mobility and space syntax is of crucial importance. This research aims to explore and demonstrate the vast potential of using large-scale mobile-phone GPS data for analysis of human activity and urban connectivity. A new type of mobile sensing data called “Auto-GPS” has been anonymously collected from 1.5 million people for a period of over one year in Japan. The analysis delivers some insights on interim evolution of population density, urban connectivity and commuting choice. The results enable urban planners to better understand the urban organism with more complete inclusion of urban activities and their evolution through space and time.