Technology, Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Education. 3rd EAI International Conference, TIE 2019, Braga, Portugal, October 17–18, 2019, Proceedings

Research Article

European Video Game Development and Disability: Reflections on Data, Rights, Decisions and Assistance

  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-030-40180-1_10,
        author={Benedikt Pielenz},
        title={European Video Game Development and Disability: Reflections on Data, Rights, Decisions and Assistance},
        proceedings={Technology, Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Education. 3rd EAI International Conference, TIE 2019, Braga, Portugal, October 17--18, 2019, Proceedings},
        proceedings_a={TIE},
        year={2020},
        month={1},
        keywords={Disability game studies European video game industry European video game development People with disabilities Assistive technologies Inclusive programming},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-030-40180-1_10}
    }
    
  • Benedikt Pielenz
    Year: 2020
    European Video Game Development and Disability: Reflections on Data, Rights, Decisions and Assistance
    TIE
    Springer
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-40180-1_10
Benedikt Pielenz1,*
  • 1: Technische Universität Darmstadt
*Contact email: benedikt.pielenz@gmail.com

Abstract

The (EU) is funding the development of computer games for people with disabilities since 2004. Since 2014, the ncy (EACEA) – as part of the EU – is responsible for the management of development and funding of European Video Games. In 2010 the European Disability Strategy has taken effect. Ever since, the integration of people with disabilities into cultural life as well as learning environments has become one of the main topics in the EU. As computer games are part of both – cultural life and learning environments – the link between people with disabilities and video games are being reflected and discussed in this paper. The results show, that on the one hand the responsibility of the EU and EACEA to include people with disabilities into the development of computer games is taken into account. On the other hand, there is a lack of current quantitative data on people with disabilities playing video games and it remains difficult to say how many people face exclusion. Moreover, assistive technologies are still a niche product. Due to their expensiveness as well as their non-plug-and-play usability, they frequently remain difficult to use. Nevertheless, possibilities to link inclusion and technology in educational environments do exist.