Body Area Networks: Smart IoT and Big Data for Intelligent Health Management. 14th EAI International Conference, BODYNETS 2019, Florence, Italy, October 2-3, 2019, Proceedings

Research Article

Capacitive Body-Coupled Communication in the 400–500 MHz Frequency Band

  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-030-34833-5_18,
        author={Robin Benarrouch and Arno Thielens and Andreia Cathelin and Antoine Frapp\^{e} and Andreas Kaiser and Jan Rabaey},
        title={Capacitive Body-Coupled Communication in the 400--500 MHz Frequency Band},
        proceedings={Body Area Networks:  Smart IoT and Big Data for Intelligent Health Management. 14th EAI International Conference, BODYNETS 2019, Florence, Italy, October 2-3, 2019, Proceedings},
        proceedings_a={BODYNETS},
        year={2019},
        month={11},
        keywords={Body area network Capacitive Body Coupled Communication Radio frequency Propagation},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-030-34833-5_18}
    }
    
  • Robin Benarrouch
    Arno Thielens
    Andreia Cathelin
    Antoine Frappé
    Andreas Kaiser
    Jan Rabaey
    Year: 2019
    Capacitive Body-Coupled Communication in the 400–500 MHz Frequency Band
    BODYNETS
    Springer
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-34833-5_18
Robin Benarrouch,*, Arno Thielens, Andreia Cathelin1, Antoine Frappé2, Andreas Kaiser2, Jan Rabaey3
  • 1: STMicroelectronics, Technology and Design Platforms
  • 2: Univ. Lille, CNRS, Centrale Lille, ISEN, Univ. Valenciennes, UMR 8520 - IEMN
  • 3: University of California Berkeley
*Contact email: robin.benarrouch@st.com

Abstract

One approach to enable wireless communication between body-worn nodes is to use capacitive body-coupled communication (C-BCC). This technique, which uses capacitive electrodes as transducing elements, has previously been demonstrated at relatively low frequencies (<200 MHz) and hence also low bandwidths. This work presents a theoretical analysis of wireless C-BCC, between body worn electrodes at higher frequencies (420–510 MHz), offering the potential for higher data rates. The theory is confirmed both by numerical simulations (performed on a human body phantom), and actual wireless communication between two prototypes on the arm of a real human.