EAI Endorsed Transactions on Smart Cities 16(4): e4

Research Article

Analysis of Rate-Based Pull and Push Strategies with Limited Migration Rates in Large Distributed Networks

Download66 downloads
  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/eai.14-12-2015.2262564,
        author={Wouter Minnebo and Benny Van Houdt},
        title={Analysis of Rate-Based Pull and Push Strategies with Limited Migration Rates in Large Distributed Networks},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on Smart Cities},
        volume={16},
        number={4},
        publisher={ACM},
        journal_a={SC},
        year={2016},
        month={1},
        keywords={distributed computing, performance analysis, processor scheduling},
        doi={10.4108/eai.14-12-2015.2262564}
    }
    
  • Wouter Minnebo
    Benny Van Houdt
    Year: 2016
    Analysis of Rate-Based Pull and Push Strategies with Limited Migration Rates in Large Distributed Networks
    SC
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.14-12-2015.2262564
Wouter Minnebo1, Benny Van Houdt1,*
  • 1: University of Antwerp
*Contact email: benny.vanhoudt@uantwerpen.be

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the performance of pull and push strategies in large homogeneous distributed systems where the number of job transfers per time unit is limited. Job transfer strategies which rely on lightly-loaded servers to attract jobs from heavily-loaded servers are known as pull strategies, whereas for push strategies the heavily loaded servers initiate the job transfers to lightly loaded servers. To this end, servers transmit probe messages to discover other servers that are able to take part in a job transfer. Previous work on rate-based pull and push strategies focused on the impact of the probe rate on the mean job response time. In this paper we also limit the overall migration rate and show that any predefined migration rate can be matched by both the rate-based pull and push strategies. We present closed form formulas for the mean response time (as a function of the allowed probe and migration rate) and validate their accuracy by simulation. We also introduce and analyze a new pull strategy and show that under high loads it is superior to the push strategies considered, while the push strategies offer only a very limited gain for medium to low load scenarios.