Mobile and Ubiquitous Systems: Computing, Networking, and Services. 9th International Conference, MobiQuitous 2012, Beijing, China, December 12-14, 2012. Revised Selected Papers

Research Article

Smartphone Sensor Reliability for Augmented Reality Applications

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-642-40238-8_11,
        author={Jeffrey Blum and Daniel Greencorn and Jeremy Cooperstock},
        title={Smartphone Sensor Reliability for Augmented Reality Applications},
        proceedings={Mobile and Ubiquitous Systems: Computing, Networking, and Services. 9th International Conference, MobiQuitous 2012, Beijing, China, December 12-14, 2012. Revised Selected Papers},
        proceedings_a={MOBIQUITOUS},
        year={2013},
        month={9},
        keywords={GPS location compass magnetometer augmented reality sensor fusion smartphones},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-642-40238-8_11}
    }
    
  • Jeffrey Blum
    Daniel Greencorn
    Jeremy Cooperstock
    Year: 2013
    Smartphone Sensor Reliability for Augmented Reality Applications
    MOBIQUITOUS
    Springer
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-40238-8_11
Jeffrey Blum1,*, Daniel Greencorn1,*, Jeremy Cooperstock1,*
  • 1: McGill University
*Contact email: jeffbl@cim.mcgill.ca, dangreencorn@cim.mcgill.ca, jer@cim.mcgill.ca

Abstract

With increasing reliance on the location and orientation sensors in smartphones for not only augmented reality applications, but also for meeting government-mandated emergency response requirements, the reliability of these sensors is a matter of great importance. Previous studies measure the accuracy of the location sensing, typically GPS, in handheld devices including smartphones, but few studies do the same for the compass or gyroscope (gyro) sensors, especially in real-world augmented reality situations. In this study, we measure the reliability of both the location and orientation capabilities of three current generation smartphones: Apple iPhone 4 and iPhone 4s (iOS) phones, as well as a Samsung Galaxy Nexus (Android). Each is tested in three different orientation/body position combinations, and in varying environmental conditions, in order to obtain quantifiable information useful for understanding the practical limits of these sensors when designing applications that rely on them. Results show mean location errors of 10–30 m and mean compass errors around 10–30°, but with high standard deviations for both making them unreliable in many settings.