2nd International ICST Conference on Simulation Tools and Techniques

Research Article

EpiNet: A Simulation Framework to Study the Spread of Malware in Wireless Networks

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  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.4108/ICST.SIMUTOOLS2009.5652,
        author={Karthik Channakeshava and Deepti Chafekar and Keith Bisset and V.S. Anil Kumar and Madhav Marathe},
        title={EpiNet: A Simulation Framework to Study the Spread of Malware in Wireless Networks},
        proceedings={2nd International ICST Conference on Simulation Tools and Techniques},
        publisher={ICST},
        proceedings_a={SIMUTOOLS},
        year={2010},
        month={5},
        keywords={Malware Bluetooth Activity-based Wireless Epidemics},
        doi={10.4108/ICST.SIMUTOOLS2009.5652}
    }
    
  • Karthik Channakeshava
    Deepti Chafekar
    Keith Bisset
    V.S. Anil Kumar
    Madhav Marathe
    Year: 2010
    EpiNet: A Simulation Framework to Study the Spread of Malware in Wireless Networks
    SIMUTOOLS
    ICST
    DOI: 10.4108/ICST.SIMUTOOLS2009.5652
Karthik Channakeshava1,*, Deepti Chafekar2,*, Keith Bisset3,*, V.S. Anil Kumar3,*, Madhav Marathe3,*
  • 1: Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061
  • 2: Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061
  • 3: Department of Computer Science and Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061
*Contact email: kchannak@vbi.vt.edu, chafekar@vbi.vt.edu, kbisset@vbi.vt.edu, akumar@vbi.vt.edu, mmarathe@vbi.vt.edu

Abstract

We describe a modeling framework to study the spread of malware over realistic wireless networks. We develop (i) methods for generating synthetic, yet realistic wireless networks using activity-based models of urban population mobility, and (ii) an interaction-based simulation framework to study the dynamics of worm propagation over wireless networks. We use the prototype framework to study how Bluetooth worms spread over realistic wireless networks. This required developing an abstract model of the Bluetooth worm and its within-host behavior. As an illustration of the applicability of our framework, and the utility of activity-based models, we compare the dynamics of Bluetooth worm epidemics over realistic wireless networks and networks generated using random waypoint mobility models. We show that realisticwireless networks exhibit very different structural properties. Importantly, these differences have significant qualitative effect on spatial as well as temporal dynamics of worm propagation. Our results also demonstrate the importance of early detection to control the epidemic.