sg 17(13): e4

Research Article

Learning and Long-Term Retention of a Complex Sensorimotor Task Within an Immersive Virtual Reality Environment in a Non-Injured Population

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  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/eai.27-12-2017.153512,
        author={Amanda E. Markham and Kathrine A. Haluch and Trevor B. Viboch and John-David Collins and Pinata H. Sessoms},
        title={Learning and Long-Term Retention of a Complex Sensorimotor Task Within an Immersive Virtual Reality Environment in a Non-Injured Population},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on Serious Games},
        volume={4},
        number={13},
        publisher={EAI},
        journal_a={SG},
        year={2017},
        month={12},
        keywords={CAREN, Immersive Virtual Reality Environment, Task-Specific Training, Retention, Operational Tasks, Learning.},
        doi={10.4108/eai.27-12-2017.153512}
    }
    
  • Amanda E. Markham
    Kathrine A. Haluch
    Trevor B. Viboch
    John-David Collins
    Pinata H. Sessoms
    Year: 2017
    Learning and Long-Term Retention of a Complex Sensorimotor Task Within an Immersive Virtual Reality Environment in a Non-Injured Population
    SG
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.27-12-2017.153512
Amanda E. Markham1,*, Kathrine A. Haluch1, Trevor B. Viboch1, John-David Collins1, Pinata H. Sessoms1
  • 1: Warfighter Performance Department, Naval Health Research Center, 140 Sylvester Road, San Diego, CA 92106-3521, USA
*Contact email: amanda.e.markham2.ctr@mail.mil

Abstract

Task-specific training in immersive virtual reality environments (IVREs) can provide practice for skills that are transferred to real-world settings. The present study examined skill acquisition and retention of a non-injured population performing a complex, sensorimotor navigation task in the Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN). Seventeen subjects participated twice weekly for 6 weeks, with follow-up visits at 3-month intervals for 1 year. Subjects performed a navigation task, where they drove a virtual boat through a scene using weight shifting and body movement. Subjects improved over time on all outcome measures. A significant effect was observed for visit number on total score, time to complete the task, number of buoys navigated successfully, and number of penalties incurred. Task-specific training in IVREs may be effective for operational skills training and rehabilitation of injured populations by employing tasks that lead to long-term retention.