el 18(17): e4

Research Article

A latent profile analysis of students’ motivation of engaging in one-to-one computing environment for English learning

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  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/eai.25-9-2018.155574,
        author={Shan Li and Juan Zheng},
        title={A latent profile analysis of students’ motivation of engaging in one-to-one computing environment for English learning},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on e-Learning},
        volume={5},
        number={17},
        publisher={EAI},
        journal_a={EL},
        year={2018},
        month={10},
        keywords={one-to-one computing environment, latent profile analysis, self-efficacy, task value, task anxiety},
        doi={10.4108/eai.25-9-2018.155574}
    }
    
  • Shan Li
    Juan Zheng
    Year: 2018
    A latent profile analysis of students’ motivation of engaging in one-to-one computing environment for English learning
    EL
    EAI
    DOI: 10.4108/eai.25-9-2018.155574
Shan Li1,*, Juan Zheng1
  • 1: Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, Faculty of Education, McGill University, 845 Sherbooke St W., Montreal, Quebec, Canada
*Contact email: shan.li2@mail.mcgill.ca

Abstract

This study used latent profile analysis to cluster students into three groups with homogenous motivational profiles based on self-reported self-efficacy, task value and task anxiety measures obtained from 263 middle school students. The results demonstrated that there were distinct motivation profiles among students while engaging in a one-to-one computing environment for English learning, which resulted in differences on their performance. In general, this eLearning environment had a significant positive effect on students’ learning achievements regardless of various motivation profiles. But students with high self-efficacy, task value while low task anxiety performed better than those in other profiles. This study also suggested that task anxiety impeded students from benefiting from the one-to-one computing environment, but it could not significantly affect students’ learning outcomes. The profiling of student motivation orientations enhanced our understanding of the complex interactions of various motivational components and extended our existing knowledge in this emerging area of student learning. Besides, the findings inform future interventions in curriculum design and effective scaffoldings.