Emerging Technologies in Computing. First International Conference, iCETiC 2018, London, UK, August 23–24, 2018, Proceedings

Research Article

Carbon Nanotube Technology as an Option for Future Computing Devices

  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-319-95450-9_14,
        author={Nataliia Luhyna and Peter Excell and Richard Day and Alison McMillan and Fawad Inam and Ardeshir Osanlou},
        title={Carbon Nanotube Technology as an Option for Future Computing Devices},
        proceedings={Emerging Technologies in Computing. First International Conference, iCETiC 2018, London, UK, August 23--24, 2018, Proceedings},
        proceedings_a={ICETIC},
        year={2018},
        month={7},
        keywords={Future computing devices Wearable devices Carbon nanotubes Epoxy nanocomposites Microwave curing},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-319-95450-9_14}
    }
    
  • Nataliia Luhyna
    Peter Excell
    Richard Day
    Alison McMillan
    Fawad Inam
    Ardeshir Osanlou
    Year: 2018
    Carbon Nanotube Technology as an Option for Future Computing Devices
    ICETIC
    Springer
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-95450-9_14
Nataliia Luhyna1,*, Peter Excell1,*, Richard Day1,*, Alison McMillan1,*, Fawad Inam2,*, Ardeshir Osanlou1,*
  • 1: Wrexham Glyndŵr University
  • 2: Northumbria University
*Contact email: n.luhyna@glyndwr.ac.uk, p.excell@glyndwr.ac.uk, r.day@glyndwr.ac.uk, alison.mcmillan@physics.org, fawad.inam@northumbria.ac.uk, a.osanlou@glyndwr.ac.uk

Abstract

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offer the potential for radical transformation of future electronics as they exhibit conductivity, semiconductor and mechanical properties that far exceed those of traditional materials. They thus offer wide opportunities for novel computing devices, especially those required to be small and light, such as “wearables”. They also offer environmental advantages by reducing energy demand in manufacture and use. A practical investigation is reported, focusing on microwave processing of a CNT composite sample. A significant reduction in energy consumption in manufacture while increasing mechanical and electrical performance is deduced, suitable for low power wearable, wireless computing devices. However, CNTs inherently suffer from flaws such as the tendency for nanoparticle agglomerations to form due to strong covalent bonds, and other uncertainties in nanoparticle behaviour. This experimental study demonstrates that microwave processing of CNT composites can reduce the power consumption and the temperature generated during the manufacturing process.