Interactivity, Game Creation, Design, Learning, and Innovation. 6th International Conference, ArtsIT 2017, and Second International Conference, DLI 2017, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, October 30–31, 2017, Proceedings

Research Article

Reconsidering Registration: New Perspectives on Augmented Reality

  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-319-76908-0_17,
        author={Hanna Schraffenberger and Edwin Heide},
        title={Reconsidering Registration: New Perspectives on Augmented Reality},
        proceedings={Interactivity, Game Creation, Design, Learning, and Innovation. 6th International Conference, ArtsIT 2017, and Second International Conference, DLI 2017, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, October 30--31, 2017, Proceedings},
        proceedings_a={ARTSIT \& DLI},
        year={2018},
        month={3},
        keywords={Augmented reality Registration Virtual-real relationships Theory Information Illusion Presence Mobile games Sound art},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-319-76908-0_17}
    }
    
  • Hanna Schraffenberger
    Edwin Heide
    Year: 2018
    Reconsidering Registration: New Perspectives on Augmented Reality
    ARTSIT & DLI
    Springer
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-76908-0_17
Hanna Schraffenberger,*, Edwin Heide1,*
  • 1: Leiden University
*Contact email: h.schraffenberger@ru.nl, e.f.van.der.heide@liacs.leidenuniv.nl

Abstract

Augmented reality (AR) projects typically involve interactive systems that align virtual objects with the real world. This process is called registration and can make it seem as if virtual objects existed in the otherwise real environment. Registration is widely accepted as a defining and necessary characteristic of augmented reality. In this paper, we reconsider the need for registration on two levels. First of all, we argue that the intended presence of virtual objects in real space can be achieved without registration by an interactive AR system. Secondly, we suggest that the perceived spatial presence of virtual content in real space is not necessary for AR in the first place. We illustrate both points with examples and propose a more encompassing view of AR that focuses on relationships between the virtual and the real rather than on registration.