Emerging Technologies for Developing Countries. First International EAI Conference, AFRICATEK 2017, Marrakech, Morocco, March 27-28, 2017 Proceedings

Research Article

Developing the IoT to Support the Health Sector: A Case Study from Kikwit, DR Congo

  • @INPROCEEDINGS{10.1007/978-3-319-67837-5_5,
        author={Piers Lawrence and Trisha Phippard and Gowri Ramachandran and Danny Hughes},
        title={Developing the IoT to Support the Health Sector: A Case Study from Kikwit, DR Congo},
        proceedings={Emerging Technologies for Developing Countries. First International EAI Conference, AFRICATEK 2017, Marrakech, Morocco, March 27-28, 2017 Proceedings},
        proceedings_a={AFRICATEK},
        year={2017},
        month={10},
        keywords={LoRaWAN e-Health ICT4D IoT for development Smart fridge Cold chain},
        doi={10.1007/978-3-319-67837-5_5}
    }
    
  • Piers Lawrence
    Trisha Phippard
    Gowri Ramachandran
    Danny Hughes
    Year: 2017
    Developing the IoT to Support the Health Sector: A Case Study from Kikwit, DR Congo
    AFRICATEK
    Springer
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-67837-5_5
Piers Lawrence1,*, Trisha Phippard1, Gowri Ramachandran1, Danny Hughes1
  • 1: KU Leuven
*Contact email: piers.lawrence@cs.kuleuven.be

Abstract

Effective implementation and evaluation of development projects depends on access to accurate, complete, and timely information about the outcomes of project implementation. We explore the proposition that next-generation ICTs offer solutions for development actors operating in decentralised and extremely low-power environments to improve data collection, monitoring, and project feedback. This paper describes the potential integration of novel distributed monitoring technologies and techniques within the health sector in developing countries, and in particular the use of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies for monitoring widely distributed projects in areas with little or no infrastructure. We discuss the application of an emerging low-power wide area networking technology, LoRa, which is ideally suited to resource-limited contexts due to its low cost, low power usage, and long range. We describe our experiences in implementing a pilot project carried out in Kikwit, DR Congo to develop a LoRa-based wireless network to track the temperature of blood products, ensuring their security and viability through a decentralised, low-power, and low-cost monitoring system.